Helping You Get The Benefits You Deserve

RESOURCES

RESOURCES

What is social security disability insurance?

Social Security Disability Insurance (SSD or SSDI) is a payroll tax-funded, federal insurance program of the United States government. It is managed by the Social Security Administration and is designed to provide income supplements to people who are physically restricted in their ability to be employed because of a notable disability, usually a physical disability. SSD can be supplied on either a temporary or permanent basis, usually directly correlated to whether the person's disability is temporary or permanent.


an overview of social security disability insurance

Social Security disability insurance (SSDI, sometimes also abbreviated as SSD) is a Social Security program that pays monthly benefits to you if you become disabled before you reach retirement age and aren't able to work. Some people know it as "workers' disability."


disability evaluation

The Social Security Administration (SSA) administers two programs that provide benefits based on disability: the Social Security disability insurance program (title II of the Social Security Act (Act)) and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program (title XVI of the Act).

Title II provides for payment of disability benefits to disabled individuals who are "insured" under the Act by virtue of their contributions to the Social Security trust fund through the Social Security tax on their earnings, as well as to certain disabled dependents of insured individuals. Title XVI provides SSI payments to disabled individuals (including children under age 18) who have limited income and resources.


REQUIREMENTS

Medical evidence is the cornerstone of the disability determination under both the title II and title XVI programs. 
Each person who files a disability claim is responsible for providing medical evidence showing he or she has an impairment(s) and the severity of the impairment(s). However, the Social Security Administration (SSA), with the claimant’s permission, will help the claimant get medical evidence from his or her own medical sources who have evaluated, examined, or treated the claimant for his or her impairment(s). SSA also requests copies of medical evidence from hospitals, clinics, or other health facilities when appropriate.


listing of adult impairments

The following sections contain medical criteria that apply to the evaluation of impairments in adults age 18 and over and that may apply to the evaluation of impairments in children under age 18 if the disease processes have a similar effect on adults and younger children.


listing of child impairments

The following sections contain medical criteria that apply only to the evaluation of impairments in children under age 18.


how to appeal a decision

If you were recently denied Social Security benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), you may request an appeal. Generally, you have 60 days after you receive the notice of our decision to ask for any type of appeal.


benefits for people with disabilities

The Social Security and Supplemental Security Income disability programs are the largest of several Federal programs that provide assistance to people with disabilities. While these two programs are different in many ways, both are administered by the Social Security Administration and only individuals who have a disability and meet medical criteria may qualify for benefits under either program.


when will your benefits start, and how much will you receive?

If your application is approved, your first Social Security benefit will be paid for the sixth full month after the date we find that your disability began. The amount of your monthly disability benefit is based on your lifetime average earnings covered by Social Security.


revisions to rules

Revisions To Rules Regarding The Evaluation Of Medical Evidence. On January 18, 2017, SSA published the final rules “Revisions to Rules Regarding the Evaluation of Medical Evidence” in the Federal Register (82 FR 5844). The final rules became effective on March 27, 2017. This page has helpful resources for the public to become familiar with the rules.  Additional detailed resources are found at the bottom of this page.