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Todd R. Renda, Social Security Disability and SSI Disability Attorney

We’re In This Together To Get You The Benefits You Deserve!

Who is eligible for Social Security Benefits?  The answer is simple, anyone who is disabled and meets the eligibility requirements stated below.

However, if you are disabled, or someone you know and love is disabled, asking for the benefits you deserve can sometimes feel overwhelming.

At Renda Law we want you to know, it doesn’t have to be! We’re in this together, and we’re here to help you get the benefits you deserve.

Here are the basic facts about Disability Benefits

Disability benefits are available to qualified recipients under two programs, Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI).

Social Security Disability Income (SSDI)

SSDI pays cash benefits to people who are unable to work for a year or more because of a disability. Benefits continue until you can work again on a regular basis, or until you reach retirement age. At that point, the disability benefits automatically convert to retirement benefits, but the amount remains the same. After receiving SSDI benefits for two years, you also become eligible for health insurance coverage under Medicare. The disability program also includes several work incentives to ease your transition back to work when and if you’re ready.

During the years you are working you accumulate a certain number of “work credits” each year. You must have some work credits accumulated before you can qualify for SSDI disability benefits. You can earn up to four credits per year of employment. How many credits you need to qualify for disability depends on the age you become disabled. Even if you are only 24 you may qualify if you have at least six credits earned in a three-year period.

As of January 2018, some 13.8 million disabled workers and their dependents were receiving SSDI benefits from Social Security.

For example, certain members of your family may qualify for disability benefits on your work record should they become disabled. The amount of these benefits will depend on your earnings record. These family members could include:

·         Your spouse who is age 62 or older, or any age if they are caring for your child who is under age 16 or disabled and receiving checks;

·         Your widow or widower or divorced spouse (if the marriage lasted at least 10 years) age 50 or older should he or she become disabled. The disability must have started before your death or within seven years after your death;

·         Your unmarried son or daughter, including an adopted child, or, in some cases, a stepchild or grandchild.

Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

SSI is a “means-tested” program. This means that you must have limited financial resources to qualify in addition to not being able to work.

Todd Renda